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NKJV Comfort Print Single-Column Reference Bible, Premium Leather, Black

(9 customer reviews)

$159.99 $83.98

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SKU: 9780785220855

Description

The Premier Collection of Thomas Nelson’s NKJV Single-Column Reference Bible combines fine craftsmanship with the elegant single-column text. Enjoy the accurate and beautiful New King James Version typeset in Thomas Nelson’s smooth and readable NKJV Comfort Print®. Featuring a supple goatskin leather cover, durable edge-lined binding, premium European Bible paper, beautiful art gilded edges, and three ribbon markers, this special edition is a treasure for a lifetime in God’s Word.
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Features include:

  • Premium goatskin leather cover
  • Smyth-sewn and edge-lined construction for flexibility
  • Art gilding on page edges: red stain under gold
  • Gilt line stamped and perimeter stitching
  • Exclusive Thomas Nelson NKJV Comfort Print® typeface
  • Three satin ribbon markers, each 3/8-inch wide
  • Premium European Bible paper, 36 gsm
  • Black-letter text
  • Complete cross-reference system with more than 72,000 text cross-references
  • Concordance
  • Elegant single-column format
  • Generous yapp
  • 10.5-point print size
  • Page size approx.: 8.125 x 5.1 x 1.6 in.

Additional information

Weight4 lbs

9 reviews for NKJV Comfort Print Single-Column Reference Bible, Premium Leather, Black

  1. 5 Solas (verified owner)

    Wow! The Thomas Nelson NKJV Premier Collection single-column reference Bible is what I wished Schuyler could have been. I have been a fan of Schuyler Bibles, but Thomas Nelson Premier Collection NKJV beats Schuyler Quentel for a number of reasons:

    1. The size of this Bible is just right. The paper trim is 8.3 inches x 5.4 inches. With the goatskin cover, the Bible is about 9.4 by 5.7 inches. It is about 1.5 inches thick. This Bible is what you would call a hand-size Bible, not overly large like the regular Schuyler Quentel or overly small like the personal size Quentel. Even the thin line Quentel is still too tall and too wide for me.
    2. The Thomas Nelson Premier NKVJ is a single column Bible which is what I prefer.
    3. Not only are the chapter numbers in red, but the section or paragraph headings (which are not part of Scripture) are in red.
    4. The red art gilt is not too red (almost baby pink), so it is easier on the eyes when the Bible is open. As a result, the chapter numbers and paragraph or section headings really pop up.
    5. The Bible maps omit the term “Palestine” as it should.
    6. At less than $100, it beats the Schuyler Quentel.

    Some qualities of this Bible that are the same as the Schuyler Quentel are:

    1. The paper is a nice 36gsm Bible paper. However, this Bible is printed in China.
    2. Same line matching technique is used which prevents ghosting.
    3. It has gilt line stamping and perimeter stitching.
    4. This Bible has a supple, less grainy goatskin cover than the Quentel, but it is also edge-lined as the Quentel.
    5. Like the Quentel, this Bible is smythe-sewn.

    I am very pleased with this Bible, and I am glad Thomas Nelson came out with this in the NKJV. The size is my ideal size in a Bible. This Bible comes with three ribbons which I removed because inserting anything in the pages of the Bible is bad for its spine. It’s supposed to be a 10.5 font size, but I believe it is smaller than that. The font is probably a 9 or a 9.5. It is still very readable, however.

  2. Wesley Bygel (verified owner)

    Great bible! Early Christmas gift from wife and kids! Meets all my needs and expectations. Great bible at a great price!

  3. Chad Cohoon (verified owner)

    I’ll try not to repeat what has already been stated about this Bible, but in short this is what I had hoped the Schuyler NKJV Quentel would have been, especially concerning text block.

    The layout is almost perfect, as is the overall size, paper, and text font (the Denmark 2K Nelson font is excellent). The combination of dimensions, layout, text size make this both a joy to read and handle privately but also a wonderful tool to wield while preaching and teaching.

    Having owned the Schuyler Quentel NKJV, the Original Schuyler Single Column, and the Cambridge Clarion, I’ve had 3 of the best NKJV editions to compare with and this Thomas Nelson is my current favorite.

    The Schuyler Single Column had a great font and I enjoyed the Single Column but the line ghosting and lack of references was more an issue than I thought it would be (Silver over blue gilt I’ve always found accent the beauty and majesty of God’s Word).

    The Cambridge Clarion is perfect… for everything but Preaching! If Cambridge would come out with a 10.5 font version, it would be all I would use. Outstanding reference section, my favorite text block (especially the minimizing of section headers). I have found the Clarion to “get out of the way” and let me read God’s Word more than any other Bible I’ve utilized. The placement of their references and NJKV translation notes to the side directly next to the referenced verses is also extremely well thought through.

    The Shuyler Quentel is one of the most beautifully crafted Bibles I’ve ever held, almost too much, lol! The font and font size are outstanding, but for me almost a tad too large. The cascading center aligned reference section at the bottom of the page makes it almost impossible for me to quickly use it and I found that I stopped trying. Though beautiful to the eye, it was not nearly as functional as my Clarion, and though I used it to Preach and Teach from, still found it cumbersome in both dimensional size and readability with it’s double column layout.

    The Nelson Comfort has the perfect balance of dimensions, Not much larger than the Clarion, smaller than the Quentel, but not so thick that you can’t hold it in one hand (I have medium sized hands to my Guitar’s chagrin!). The references are easy to visually access on the outside margins, vertically arranged with the corresponding letter “a”, “b” etc., highlighted in the scriptural text itself. I would have also like to see the scripture verse numbers to have been in bold or a different font to make them easier to find.

    As to value, this was much less expensive than the Quentel (or Clarion) but this comes at the cost of having it printed in one of the country’s responsible for some of the severest persecution against any of their citizens that choose to follow what this Bible instructs… still wrestling with that one. I also could have purchased this for $15 less on Amazon, but enjoy supporting Evangelical Bible and it’s founder’s ministering.

    As to aesthetics, the Nelson goatskin is much softer with a smoother grain than the Quentel. I personally enjoyed the feel of the Quentel more (I’m a guy :). I had my Clarion rebound by Leonards Books in English Calfskin (bought the cheaper Calf-Split purposefully), and have found that to have been a robust solution as well. I also miss the ribs on the spine which my Schuyler Quentel had.. actually the spine in general had a greater firmness to it in general on the Quentel. The spine on the Nelson is smooth and feels a tad too open, but not an aspect which discourages my use of it. The only other “improvement” I’d like to see with this edition would be a dark navy blue, with silver over blue gilt edges, and perhaps a more robust map, reference section, and a 2-year through-the-bible example.

    We are so truly blessed in this nation to have such choices. I always struggle with writing any reviews about Bibles knowing full well how many world-wide are persecuted for even owning one, and how many would sacrifice so much for any copy regardless of craftsmanship. Let us all continue to lift them up before God’s throne! The Lord gave me a desire to own a few excellent copies of His Word… basically in short, if I was willing to spent $300 on a grill why wasn’t I willing to sacrifice the same for an heirloom class of God’s gift to us in writ?

    Thanks EB for the great packaging and quick shipment. Keep the Lord and His Work your focus!

    Love & Shalom, “Come quickly, Lord Come!”

  4. A L Hickman (verified owner)

    I concur with all the praise of this bible. It is comparable to the other super premium bibles here. The translation note and cross reference superscripts are also in red which is helpful. As someone else has said, the verse numbers could be more prominent. At 2.5 pounds I was afraid it would be something of a brick but after an hour I was completely accustomed to it and prefer its size. It is portable and rocking chair ready.

  5. William Eaton (verified owner)

    What’s been said already is true. The pages are bright and text crisp and readable. Quality is evident everywhere. While I wish it was a bit thinner; it’s my home Bible. Pitt Minion (and a magnifier) are fine for travels. This TN single column, comfort print is quite a treasure.

  6. Sharyn L. Greenlee (verified owner)

    I am still so much with this Bible. Have many Bibles, but know this one will become one of my favorites. It’s a fat little Bible that you can cuddle with when you read. So soft. I was a bit concerned about the smell at first. Seemed a bit chemical. I love it so much. I’ve kept it out of box praying it would clear up and it seems ok. With a low line athsmatic condition the smell is an issue. I too concerned about China. I can tell you that it is so lovely. Would highly recommend it. Just hoping I’ll be able to put in box or case without having an odor.

  7. mikeisho (verified owner)

    Very good quality bible .

  8. Michael (verified owner)

    I bought this for my daily Bible reading plan. Came very fast. It’s just beautiful and easy to read.

  9. Howie (verified owner)

    (1) Background. I purchased a copy of the NKJV Comfort Print Single-Column Reference Bible, Premium Leather, Black (“Comfort Print”) from Evangelicalbible.com in November 2018, and have been using the edition for about a year, so I can now write this review based on my experience in reading, studying and mediating on Scriptures using this edition (and not based on first impressions that often deceive me). Most of the following comments are just my opinion, and I am aware that everyone has different needs and preferences, depending on age, life style, and use case. I wrote this candid review (i) in a hope that some publishers might come up with an improved design that would allow His disciples to focus more on the Word of God; and (ii) to help people make an informed decision. I tried not to repeat the same positive comments that were already made by other reviewers. Just so you know, I am neither a minister nor affiliated with any publishers.
    (2) Summary.
    (A) In terms of font size, page size, and thickness and opacity of papers, I found Comfort Print to be better than Cambridge NKJV Clarion Reference Bible, Black Calf Split Leather (“Clarion”) that I purchased back in 2013.
    (B) In terms of chapter numbers, headings, superscripts, and notes and references, I found Clarion to be much better than Comfort Print.
    (C) Both Comfort Print and Clarion are one volume edition (and not two volume set); resulting in somewhat small font size and inability to compare OT and NT verses side by side.
    (D) Comfort Print was printed in a country where Christians are being persecuted, whereas Clarion was printed and bound in the Netherlands.
    (3) Details.
    (A) Font Size. I wish the font size of Comfort Print was slightly larger (perhaps by 0.5 point) so I can read for hours without difficulty. Clarion has even smaller font, so I can no longer use it for extended reading and studying. (I am blessed with healthy eyes, although I use prescription reading glasses.)
    (B) Chapter Numbers. Chapter numbers of Comfort Print are printed in red, so they pop out of the pages, disrupting the flow and context of Scripture and my chain of thought during reading. If the publisher did not want to use black, perhaps they could have used navy blue (that has calming effect) instead of red (that has alarming effect). With Clarion, it’s easier to ignore chapter numbers, for they are printed in black.
    (C) Headings. With Comfort Print, paragraph headings (that are not part of Scripture) are printed in red so they jump out at me, making it hard to focus on the word of God during extended reading, studying and meditation. If the publisher did not want to use black, perhaps they could have used navy blue instead of red. Clarion is much better in that regard, for it uses elegant, black italics, so it’s easier to ignore the headings.
    (D) Superscripts.
    (i) For Verse Numbers. With Comfort Print, those superscripts for verse numbers that are within paragraphs are hard to find, for they are not prominent. This may be an inherent issue for single-column format. Perhaps use of bold font or navy blue might help. Clarion has the same issue.
    (ii) For Notes and References. With Comfort Print, superscripts for translation notes and cross references are in red color (having alarming effect), so my reading is frequently disrupted by them. This is the biggest problem I have with Comfort Print, for it hinders my communication with my Lord Jesus Christ. With Clarion, the superscripts are printed in black so it’s a bit easier for me to ignore them (although they still annoy me from time to time).
    (E) Notes and References. With Comfort Print, the translation notes and cross references in the margin are not placed to the side directly next to the referenced words, so it’s difficult for me to find the right notes and references. In addition, after I find the right note or reference, my eyes need to travel quite a distance between the words and the note/reference back and forth. Furthermore, all the notes and references are placed towards the bottom of the page, so I cannot write comments in the side margin towards the lower part of the page. Clarion really shines in all aspects of (E).
    (F) One Volume. With both Comfort Print and Clarion, the Old Testament and the New Testament are combined into one volume. Since many of the verses in the NT are based on or related to OT verses, I need to frequently flip pages back and forth, and cannot see and examine the related or referenced words side by side for deep reading and analysis. I hope some publishers will come up with a two volume set, consisting of OT volume and NT volume. This approach may also make it possible for the publishers to slightly increase the font size without resorting to double-column format or thinner paper.
    (4) Gratitude. I thank Lord for providing us with various options for carefully designed and manufactured English Bible versions. And I thank Evangelicalbible.com for providing us with informative and convenient market place for finely crafted Bibles.

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